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15 Tips to Get Safely Home Following an EMP August 8, 2017

Let’s just say that the unthinkable becomes the real and happening.  Let’s take this article and go over it.  This will be a segment in three parts, the next ones being immediate actions taken at work and at home.  I’m hitting on traveling first, as there are so many vacationers jaunting around happily over the landscape.  All kidding aside, traffic is congested during the summer, extending traveling time on the commutes.  Let’s game the scenario, and here it is.

Here’s the scenario:

You’re cruising down the highway in your 2013 four-door sedan, having just dropped the kids off twenty minutes ago to the swim club.  Now you’re on the open highway with a heavy traffic flow…about 5 miles from the edge of town and 7 miles from work.  You’re listening to the radio, when suddenly it crackles and goes dead, along with your engine.  You look around and pumping the brakes manage to slow down and then drive off the road onto the shoulder, just feet away from the back bumper of another vehicle.

The vehicle comes to a stop, and you try the ignition again.  You look at your watch, a Casio G-Shock, to find there is no display.  You reach for your cell phone.  Nothing.  It’s dead.  There are perhaps a dozen cars around you…half to your front and half to your rear.  All of them have stopped, and most of the drivers have gotten out.  You hear the sound of an engine, and looking up, see a ’58 Ford pickup truck weaving in and out of the stalled traffic, moving toward your rear, away from town.  The book “One Second After” has just played out in real life.  The United States has been attacked by an EMP (Electromagnetic Pulse) weapon.  You’re 15 miles from home, and the “S” has hit the fan.

On Friday 7/29/17, North Korea just successfully tested an ICBM (Intercontinental Ballistic Missile) and experts from four different countries including the U.S. have determined that they have the capability of striking the U.S. anywhere.  That means the optimal point for an EMP strike (dead center of the continental U.S., at 300 km above ground) is not only their prime target but also attainable.

15 Tips to Get Safely Home Following an EMP

Back to our scenario.  Most will be clueless and unprepared.  Let’s do it up, down and dirty with the steps that you should take if you are “Citizen X” outlined in the scenario:

1. Have a plan already in place: That means to formulate one right now, f you haven’t already done so.

2. If there are a lot of people around, such as in the scenario, then immediately grab your gear and get out of there. What gear, you may ask?  We’ve “gamed” much of this to the point of nausea, but let’s list out those essentials:

“Go/Bug Out Bag”: This guy already needs to be packed and ready, in that vehicle that will become a 3,000-lb. paperweight. Three days’ supply of ready-to-eat food, one day’s worth of water and the means to filter more.  Compass, flashlight, knife, first aid kit, poncho, jacket/sweatshirt, extra socks, map, light sleeping bag, fire starting material, small fishing kit (hooks, line, bobber), sewing kit, MSW (Minor Surgical Wound) kit, extra cash ($20 denominations and smaller), ground pad, extra clothing (hat, OG bandana, etc.), and ammo.

Weapon: Please don’t feed me “legal information,” or “I can’t do that in my state.” These are “sink or swim” rules.  If you don’t have a weapon now, you may not have one later.  If you don’t have the fortitude to take that weapon and be ready to use it when the time comes, then you probably won’t survive this or be able to help your family.  One rifle, one pistol, with ammo for each.

Grab that bag and put it on, securing your weapons. Then secure the vehicle, closing the windows and locking it up.  If nobody is around, throw it into neutral and push it off the road.  Camouflage it with branches and leaves…taking care not to cut them from the immediate area that you stash it.  Most likely it’ll be “violated,” so now is the time to take the stuff you need and get it out. If the scenario above applies, just secure the vehicle and get out of there.

3. Traveling: Do not walk on the roads. Skirt the road with about 50 meters (that’s about 150 feet) between you and the edge of the road.  Stay away from people unless you know them and trust them…both qualities are emboldened.

4. For metro people: If you are out in the suburbs or open road, and you must return to the city? It may be better for you and your family to arrange for a rallying point outside of the city.  If that isn’t possible, then you should exercise extreme caution.  Allow the nearest family member to secure the home and then wait for you.  Travel when it’s dark to be on the safe side.  Your visibility is cut down, and so is the visibility of those who may be hunting you.

5. Long distance to go? Forage along the way.  Refill your canteens/water bottles whenever you’re able, and take note of any freestanding water supplies or “blue” features (that’s the color of water on a military map) for use in the future.  DON’T MARK YOUR MAP!  If someone gets a hold of it, you do not want them to be able to find your home.  You must commit the route to memory and adjust your steps accordingly.

6. Dealing with the Stress of the Event: The power is not coming back on…ever…and it really has begun…the Day After Doomsday is here. Take a deep breath and concentrate on your training, your preparations.  If you don’t have any, then this piece is a wake-up call to get moving!  The best way to do it is immediately accepting what has happened without dwelling on it.  Concentrate on the tasks at hand: navigating home, scouting what is in between, and foraging for anything you need.  You have a job to do!  Reconnaissance!  We’ll go over that now.

Reconnaissance: You must see on the ground what is in between you and the happy Hallmark home you’re returning to. You should take note of any places that hold medical supplies, food, or anything you may need for yourself or your family.  You should take note of possible refuge sites to hide if you and the family hightail it out of the home instead of having a “Walton Family Homecoming.”  You must take note of water features, danger locations (cliffs or impassable terrain features), as well as dangerous individuals.  Yes, the ones who were jerks before all of this?  Wait until you see how they’ll be now, with no controls exercised over them.

7. The best advice I can give: Travel at night. This may be impossible for several reasons.  Firstly, if it’s an all-out nuke attack, there may be the problem of radiation for you, in which case you’ll have to either reach home immediately or seek shelter immediately to remain in place for several weeks.  Secondly, you may have other family members that need to be attended to and cannot wait for a long time.  The kids in the scenario are a prime example.  If it is an EMP only, there will be a “quiet period” of about 6 to 12 hours before everything breaks loose and the sequel to the movie “The Road” begins in real life.  Darkness is the best time to travel.  It hides you and helps you to cover your tracks until the morning light.

8.The rest of the family: They must KNOW THE OVERALL PLAN AND HAVE A PLAN OF THEIR OWN TO FOLLOW UNTIL YOU GET THEM OR UNTIL THEY REACH HOME. This is all going to take some preparation on your part and remember the saying: An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.  Don’t put it off!

9. Avoid people, families, and groups of people. Your goal when traveling is to be invisible.  I wrote some articles on how to hunt and how to avoid the manhunt.  You may want to refresh yourself on those points, and follow a few basic rules I keep in my own mind and heart:

  • When a disaster occurs, everyone is your “friend” even when they are not
  • There is no interest but self-interest outside of you and your immediate family
  • Whatever you need and have, they also need and want
  • They will kill you for the barest of essentials of what you’re carrying
  • Don’t talk to anyone: don’t exchange information, pleasantries, and do not tell anyone anything about yourself, your family, your general destination, or your home…it can be used against you later…and it will be.

10. Coming home: Don’t walk right on in. Use a roundabout route, and go to a spot where you can watch your house for at least half an hour or so before making your “triumphant return.”  The S has hit the fan, and this is not the return of the Prodigal…you’re just going to tiptoe in.  But before you tiptoe through the tulips and the window, keep in mind that Tiny Tim and his gang of marauders may have done it before you.  That is why you want to watch the house closely.  Best Advice I can give: Have your kids/spouse put up a long-distance-visible sign/signal so that you know everything is either OK or that you’ll have to come in and rescue the family.  For example, if the birdhouse is still on the corner of the porch, then all is well.  If the birdhouse is gone, or if it’s sitting on top of the post that holds the mailbox…well, time to play CQB (that’s Close Quarters Battle) and clear the house of the rats.

11. Never underestimate anyone’s ability to take your family members hostage: That goes for the “friendly neighbors,” most of all…the biggest rats on the block. If that happens, guess what?  You’re now the HRT (that’s Hostage Rescue Team), or you better have a couple of guys such as this in your survival group/pod/neighborhood unit.  The hardest guy or gal in the world will “cave” when their son or daughter is being held at gunpoint by some goon.

12. You’re home…Now, it’s time to fight! That’s right!  Just when you thought it would be cozy and comfortable…just you and the family and your happy supplies…here comes a whole bagful of “Gummi Bears” down the block…only these bears are armed with baseball bats, zip guns, chains, and crowbars.  Armed also with about a week of BO (that’s Body Odor), all twelve of them combined still have an IQ of 50, tops…and here they are, at your door.  They don’t want Halloween candy, by the way.  You just walked twenty miles.          Say, remember that article I wrote about using ginseng, and drinking coffee to help you keep alert and awake?  I hope that one comes to mind because it’s about to become a “festival” at your house.  We’re going to cover more on this in the next segment.

13. Obtain that “second set” of electronic equipment. Oh yeah, the one JJ continuously warns about!  Well, now that all your electronics that were exposed are junk, I hope you made some Faraday cages and stashed an extra one of those radios…or even several, for those of you who thought long-term.  You need to find out what’s going on.  Ham radios may help if you shielded them.  So may CB’s and satellite phones.

14. Arm the whole family: by the time you reach home, every family member either accompanying you (small children and toddlers excepted) should be armed. Time to really see how tight and full of solidarity you are as a real family unit…one that must fight in order to survive.

15. Exit stage left: You may just find that the homecoming isn’t; that is, you must write it off as a loss and get out of there…it’s either destroyed and burning or occupied by the marauders. Unless you have the skills and the ability to deal with all of them, it is better to retreat and stay alive.  You need a plan in place in order to make this work.

We’ve covered a lot of information here.  This is all designed to stimulate those creative thought processes.  The thinking alone is not enough: you must formulate a plan and then implement it.  A plan without action is of no use.  A plan executed too late is a tragedy: a funeral dirge getting ready to play.  Don’t be too late to formulate your plan for you and your family.  If the lights go out, it doesn’t necessarily mean that the party’s over…and the party may be one that never comes to an end.  Fight that good fight each and every day!  JJ out!

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Originally published August 8th, 2017
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7 Critical Components of a Prepared Home July 14, 2017

ReadyNutrition Guys and Gals, it doesn’t take a stretch of the imagination to see that we’re living in perilous times and on the brink of a slew of problems.  There are several flashpoints occurring domestically and throughout the world that can translate into destabilization at any time.  Knowing these things, your preparations and training need to continue.  You can continue this preparation by conducting a home assessment regarding medicines and supplies you will need.

It’s time to prepare for the worst-case scenario with this best-selling preparedness manual

What do I mean by this?  I mean for you to specifically identify all the needs of each of your family members and begin acquiring them.  Family members have varying needs depending on age and physical condition.  Now is the time to ensure you have all the meds you need and the vitamins you will need when the SHTF.  Allow me to sound the personal “trumpet” that I have been sounding throughout the years and in many articles:

You guys and gals need to get into good physical shape: it cannot be overemphasized.

7 Critical Components of a Prepared Home

That being said, how do you start?  It is simple enough if you just insert a measure of organization into it.  Let’s do it, shall we?

  1. Start by identifying family members who have special needs and/or ongoing, long-term treatment in terms of medication.  Examples of conditions can be Type I Diabetics, Blood Pressure/Circulatory patients (meds such as Calcium Channel blockers, etc.), and family members with respiratory compromise (such as COPD, or severe, chronic asthma).
  2. Make a chart/sheet for each family member and identify what they need: The correct medicine, the amount needed/dosage, the quantity that is on hand, and a plan to attain more of it.  BE SPECIFIC!  Accuracy is critical: you cannot afford a “transposition error” either in dosage or in the name of the med.  “Flexiril” and “Flagyl” should never be confused, for example.  One extra “zero” at the end of a dosage could mean death; one zero “short” could mean substandard, inadequate dosage.
  3. Shop the sources: Price is almost as important as quality…because you will need quantities. Many items can be purchased at discount stores. Make sure you have these 50 items as the basis for your medical supplies. Once you have these, then you can begin to combine your medical supplies to make first response packs for faster medical attention when emergencies occur. Check out all the discount pharmacies that you can and do your research.  Also, convince your happy, Hallmark-Card family physician to write these extra prescriptions for you.  If he or she won’t do it?  DX’em.  That’s an Army term: meaning dump/discard them.  If you don’t use the stones now, you won’t use them when the SHTF.
  4. Pet antibiotics: Yes, “protect the pets,” as I’ve explained in other articles. Pet amoxicillin, pet erythromycin, pet Praziquantel (Biltricide).  All of these “goodies” and more are available…to keep those “pets” readily supplied with medicine.  ‘Nuff said there.
  5. Vitamins/supplements: Concentrate on the multi-vitamins, and others that are crucial, such as Vitamin C. Again, you need to be sharp when it comes to quality and quantity.  Here are five supplements you should seriously consider. Never sacrifice quality for quantity, except if the comparable product is so close to the “top dog” that the difference is negligible.
  6. Herbal/Naturopathic supplies: Here is where your research is going to be critical. DO NOT EXPECT TO BE “SPOON-FED” INFORMATION, especially by your photo-frame-phony-photo family physician.  You have to assess on your own what herbs will do the backup for your family member’s (or your) needs if the med supply dries up or is unavailable.  There’s a secondary reason: you need to learn and memorize these herbs “cold,” because you may have to scrounge for them as well…in a ruined, burned-out health food concern, or out in the wild with wild-crafting.
  7. OPSEC: Don’t allow anyone outside of the immediate family (and even with them…screen ‘em!) to know about your medicines.  You need to safeguard them in protective containers that will safeguard them from elements and secret them from the eyes of marauders or other jerks that will pillage them.

Now is the time to get all of this stuff done.  You are responsible in the end for taking care of yourself and your family.  Do not procrastinate.  You may not have a perfect example to follow, but you can allow common sense, savvy, and street smarts to guide you in the path you need to pursue.  Don’t put off until tomorrow what you can do today.  The “bad days” will come upon us in an instant.  Less than an instant.  Fight that good fight, and stock up on those supplies you’ll need to take care of your family now…because you won’t be able to on the day after it hits!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Originally published July 14th, 2017
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Is Your Car Bug-Out Ready for Summer Emergencies? These 8 Items are a Must! July 3, 2017


ReadyNutrition Readers, this article is to formulate some preps for you and your vehicle for a daily basis during the months of summer.  Why?  Because the summer months hold some potential for problems that are quite different from the winter months, and the S can HTF at any time, that is why.  Dehydration, sunburn, sunstroke, and other dangerous events can happen in addition to the EMP (Electromagnetic Pulse) attack that turns your 2016 Dodge Ram pickup into a motionless slab of several tons.

First, let’s address the issue of dehydration.  Water.  Simple solution, right?  Wrong.  Should a disaster occur, all the existing water lines may either be contaminated and/or non-functional.  And there you are on the highway.  Do you know how to procure water in the wild? Humans need 1 gallon per day on normal/non-stressful days.  You will need a couple of gallons of water in your vehicle in sturdy containers.  Your “bug-out”/go bag is already in the car.  Make sure you have a three-day supply of food and a method to purify water, in addition to a method to tote it.  Many prefer the Camelback drinking systems.  I stick with the issue canteens.  Whatever method you choose, you’ll need to add a couple of gallons into them eventually.

In your backpack, you want to either have a poncho or some type of “space” blanket, preferably (with the latter) containing grommets.  If you can’t find one with the grommet holes, there is a grommet-making kit available in Wal-Mart or another big-box store for around $10.  The poncho comes with the grommets.  You will also need (5) bungee cords.  In this matter, you can use the 4 grommeted corners and the middle of the poncho/blanket to construct some kind of shelter to shield you from the sun.

Yeah, I know, Mr. Negative…if there’s trees to attach the bungees to, then why would a person need to spread out a shelter at all?  Simple.  Just because you may make it to a wooded area doesn’t mean that the trees provide adequate protection from the sun.  In addition, yeah…next is, what if there are no trees?  Then you use the bungee cords and attach them to other things, such as the bumper of that now-defunct Dodge truck, or a chain-linked fence…to make a lean-to and take you out of the sun.

An Ounce of Prevention is Worth a Pound of Cure

Here’s a short (and by no means complete) list of some things to have with you on your daily commute, some of which we have covered in previous articles:

  1. Electrolyte packets
  2. Small (compact) first-aid kit
  3. Knife (folding/Swiss Army)
  4. Fire starting materials with matches or cigarette lighter
  5. Radio
  6. Flashlight
  7. Firearm(s) and ammo
  8. Tools

The situation is going to dictate the actions you take.  Obviously, if a nuclear war is what occurs, then you are going to have a different set of dangers than if a viral pandemic is occurring.  You will make the determination about what you will do, but you should have these basic supplies with you and readily accessible at all times.  If you are parked in a parking garage and you still must walk three blocks or more to reach the office, this is not near enough.  In such a case, have multiple bags…one in your vehicle, and one within the workplace by your desk, as I have stressed in the past.

You’ll also need good sunglasses with a 100% UV protection factor.  Along with this, a strong sunscreen, with an SPF of 50 or greater.  A floppy hat would also do you some good for any kind of walks that will shield both your head and face from the sun.  Also, don’t forget a bottle of good bug repellant.  You don’t think the bugs will stop bothering you and take a break while the disaster strikes, do you?  An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.  Take all of these things into consideration, remembering that the summer sun can be more than just a happy shining face on a box of cereal.  It can also be a deadly furnace trying to turn you into jerky.  On that happy note, keep fighting that good fight and have those supplies ready for when you need them.  JJ out!

 

Additional Reading Material:

5 Ways To Keep Your Vehicle Evacuation-Ready

Vehicle 72 Hour Kits

The Preparedness Guide that will Get You Ready for Any Disaster

Emergency Evacuation Checklist

 

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Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Originally published July 3rd, 2017
Comments Off on Is Your Car Bug-Out Ready for Summer Emergencies? These 8 Items are a Must!