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Are you Prepared?

5 Everyday Items That Will Double as Defensive Weapons June 10, 2017

So, ReadyNutrition Readers, in another article we presented some everyday items normally carried that can be converted into defensive weapons.  Let’s elaborate with some others that you might not readily think of as being able to be utilized in your defense.  Let’s jump right into it, as this is a time of uncertainty with civil unrest and rioting being the norm and not the exception.

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These Everyday Items Can Quickly Become Improvised Self-Defense Weapons

  1. The baseball bat.  For playing baseball, of course.  Throw a couple of gloves and a ball in a plastic grocery bag for that time you run into your buddies for a friendly game of ball.  And while you’re waiting…when a couple of hoodlums with knives come “sauntering” up to you, it might be a good idea to have that baseball bat handy.  My personal choice is a T-ball bat, made of aluminum, and it works.  Once again, you have to train with it, but I guarantee you’ll be just fine with some practice.  Do they want you with knives?  I assure you, the bat will deter them…one way or another.
  2. The cane. What a pleasant walking accouterment!  Something to lean on, and help you brace yourself as you walk uphill.  Oh, and remember those hoodlums we discussed in “number 1” here?  Once more, the proper training and practice will have you serving those knives up to them ala carte.  I prefer the ones made from aluminum to the wooden ones, although wood will work.  These are just pure canes, now, not “sword” canes or other specially-outfitted devices.
  3. The umbrella. This one is a little riskier, for the sole reason that it must be sturdy.  They make them, but you’ll have to do some searching for the really strong ones.  As a striking or a stabbing weapon, you’ll have something to work with.  If you wish to do some special work on them, just use your imagination.
  4. Walking stick. Different from a cane, due to the length.  This one (unless you’re in New York City where nothing is considered weird) you may have to be in a different setting to employ.  Nevertheless, that walking stick is really a staff, and there’s where real training will come in handy.  Get a good one that is sturdy and somewhat ornate/art-decorated.  This last feature will give you more of a cover, as unless you’re auditioning for a “shepherd” position or the lead role of “Moses” in the “Ten Commandments” remake, it’ll be hard to pass off your “staff” in an urban setting.
  5. The crowbar. This one will have to stay in the vehicle.  Be smart: make sure it’s not the only tool in the back seat.  Always think ahead in that regard.  If you’re in the trades, it’ll be a little simpler for you.

With all of these examples, the crowbar and the baseball bat are the ones you’ll have to leave in the car.  The rest you can carry with you with relative impunity, with the Walking Stick being the only one that may arouse attention in an urban or suburban setting.  Your objective is not to be a Ninja: it is to be a camouflaged citizen not looking for any trouble.  These suggested weapons are to allow you to have a “distance” weapon: a tool to be able to deal with someone who wishes to hurt you.

In the following video, pay attention to the strike zones and areas on the body that will inflict the most damage to your attacker. Accurately striking in the right areas on the body will drop your attacker and give you time to distance yourself.

Now, you should practice using these items, gripping your selected tool and taking the right swings. Practice in front of a mirror and then with a heavy bag.  Know your striking areas and how to deal with an attacker who has a weapon such as a knife or a club.  Practice with a family member.  I’m not advocating violence.  Nevertheless, I am advocating taking a stand when you cannot either diffuse the situation or avoid it by withdrawing.  Still, it is better to have an option than to offer them a smile and hope for their goodwill.  There is a time to fight.  Perhaps this piece will give you an idea when that is your only option.  JJ out!

 

Additional Reading Material:

Hard Core Chicks: Eight Self Defense Tactics Every Women Should Know

Disarmed? How to Create DIY Self-Defense Tools With Items in Your Home

Fight Like Jason Bourne: 7 Key Points to Surviving a Serious Fight

6 Non-Lethal Weapons to Carry Instead of a Gun

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Originally published June 10th, 2017
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Prepper Sustainability: How to Observe and Monitor Local Game June 9, 2017

I have written a few articles here and there on the benefits of hunting, as well as some firearms for you to consider.  There is a good reason for becoming proficient in hunting.  You must eat, and you must feed your family.  Sometimes it’s the small things…the small details that lead to success in the larger, bigger picture.  In order to be proficient with hunting, you need to learn about your quarry.

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Why is this important?  Because in a grid-down, SHTF situation, you’re going to need to eat, and you probably will not be able to grow everything you need or raise all the livestock you will use to support the family.  The blending of agriculture and animal husbandry is not complete until you have also learned to become a hunter-gatherer when need be.  Our Revolutionary forefathers supplemented the meat slaughtered at the happy butchers with meat they shot in the woods.

So, how do you learn about your quarry?  There are lots of different ways.  The library is replete with books and videos on every subject from deer to migratory birds, from field care and butchering wild game to the habits of game animals.  No, what I’m referring to here is to take the time and do a study of your immediate area and/or the closest woods to your home.

A notebook needs to be compiled with your observations.  It is not hunting season, and there are plenty of deer and other game animals to observe and learn about.  Finding the deer trails means finding where the deer go in the normal course of the day to forage and to drink.  Learning where the squirrels can be found, where the pheasants bed down for the night, and where aquatic birds such as ducks and geese can be found are some keys.  By observing them, you also have to maintain your silence and mask your scent…so you’re training while you’re observing them: you’re practicing your stealth and masking your presence.

You need to find out where your predators are: black bear, bobcat, and so forth.  Remember, when you hunt for game, you’re competing with them.  In a survival situation, you may also have to rely on them for a food source.  It would behoove you to map out your area.  Use existing maps and either trace them out and create a whole new map or make an overlay where you can mark important points where you find them.  When you see groups of deer, try to identify them as a unit and as individuals.  You may have “group 1” that has a couple of bucks and does, and two fawns.

This Group 1 may be identified because one of the bucks is missing one antler, or another has a limp.  This is all fieldcraft, and it can pay off because in a SHTF situation, you’re not the only one who’s going to be hunting the wild game.  Give yourself the edge of knowing what is in your area and their regular feeding and watering times.  It will take time, but you can practice a boatload of other tasks as well and boost your training.  Learn to document exactly where they are moving, what they are doing, and the times.

Soon you’ll have a collection of notes that you can rely upon to gauge the habits of these animals.  For birds: knowing their haunts can lead to learning about where they nest and where they bed down for the night.  This can yield eggs in addition to meat.  Where the ducks and geese are feeding, the chances are this is a good area for fishing, as well.  As you gather information, you will be painting a picture…similar to a documentary…on their habits and activities.  Supplement this with watching what they do.

Watch what they eat, and familiarize yourself with these local plants.  You’ll also want to be aware of how many people frequent these areas.  Other people will be your competition for hunting wild game in a collapse-scenario.  Use a compass and map, and have exact locations described in detail.  Why?  Here’s why.

The scenario: we suffer a collapse, and in the course of things, you develop an infection and are going to die.  You’re leaving behind a wife and two kids, boy and a girl.  “Standard fare,” right?  Now, if you don’t document where all of this wild game is, how are they going to hunt for themselves while you’re in the backyard under a headstone?  That journal with all the habits and haunts of that wild game can benefit them and give them a better chance.

So, Springtime is here.  Go out and get yourself some good training by hiking around and following the wild game and migratory birds.  Learn about your backyard, and it just may be that someday (if your notes are good) the information may benefit you or benefit others who rely on you if you’re not around.  Let’s hope that latter is not the case.  Keep in that good fight, and fight it to win.  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Originally published June 9th, 2017
Comments Off on Prepper Sustainability: How to Observe and Monitor Local Game

The Family Preparedness Guide to Surviving a Nuclear Disaster June 6, 2017

One of the most important characteristics of survivalists, preppers, and their ilk is the ability to concede that no matter how improbable it may be for a situation to arise, it is still possible.  With the current state of affairs of the world being the way they are, there is nothing in the news that can truly dissuade a prepper from this concept.  That being said, what if a nuclear war occurs?  No, really: what will you do, and what actions will you take when it begins?

Learn How Tactical Gas Masks Can Save Your Life

We have covered the topic of preparedness for a nuclear war before, but we have not discussed immediate actions to take within the first hours that such a nightmare becomes a reality.  First, let us mention again Cresson Kearney’s work Nuclear War Survival Skills,” and can also be downloaded from the internet.  It is the end-all, be-all for information on preparedness for a nuclear war.

Immediate Actions a Family Must Take to Survive Nuclear War

The topic for this article is immediate actions to be taken when nuclear war present itself; however, stress and emphasis must be made on preparations beforehand.  You want to garner all of the supplies possible beforehand and prepare a fallout shelter before the football game kicks off.  This will cut down on the scrambling when it all comes about.  There will be enough confusion in the works, and you don’t need to make any more for yourself through a lack of readiness by not having supplies you need in place.  Let’s cover some basics questions you need to answer for yourself and your family.

  1. A Plan: you need a plan to “kick into action” immediately, depending on where you are…at home, at work, or traveling. This plan needs to take into account what you’ll do if your engine dies (from the EMP, or Electromagnetic Pulse), for example, and you’re still five miles from home.
  2. “Rounding Up the Tribe”: How will you gather your family together? Do they know the plan and are they both on board with it and prepared to act in accordance with it?  You need an ORP (Objective Rally Point), so to speak: a place to meet together in one location, if for the purpose of consolidating and traveling back home together.
  3. Assessing the Targeted Areas: this must be done beforehand, and if you are in a targeted area susceptible to attack, you better be prepared to move out of it.
  4. Personal Protection from Radiation: (in accordance with your assessment of how much radiation there will be) Do you have Geiger Counters (radiological survey meters), dosimeters, and a suit and mask to protect you from the radiation? If so, how will you get to them/into them when it occurs?
  5. [We’re using a “Shelter in the Home” Scenario]: OK, you made it home. Now, do you have backup measures in place for the loss of electricity that will occur?  Do you have a shelter where you can “hole up” for at least the next three weeks to a month?  Is it defensible?  Can you effect such a defense while radiation is still at a dangerous level?  Let’s review what needs to be in the shelter:
  6. Food and water supply for all members…at least six months’ worth
  7. Medical supplies and equipment
  8. Shielded electronic supplies (radio, night vision devices, etc., shielded until it is safe to expose them with no threat of EMP) in Faraday cages
  9. Weapons and ammunition to defend yourselves
  10. Tools and materials to repair or replace components of the shelter
  11. Equipment to monitor radiation levels inside and outside of the shelter
  12. Sanitation and hygiene measures (people don’t stop going to the bathroom or needing to clean themselves regularly)
  13. Books and reading material: survival oriented, and also for a diversion
  14. After the exchange has halted: What will you and your family do then?  Remain in place, or head for new ground?

Time is of the Essence

There won’t be a lot of time for action.  Hopefully, you’ll be at home, and able to take steps from there.  Such steps can include (but are not limited to): covering all of the basement windows with dirt, and if you have a basement or sub-basement shelter, securing all parts of it prior to relocating into it with your family.  You’ll already (hopefully) have your supplies ready and in position, but you can also run the water and fill up as many containers as possible to take down with you.  Same with food: any canned or dried goods that you can move from the upstairs into the shelter will be money in the bank for you later.

There’s never enough blankets and clothes: stock some of these down in your shelter.  Pets are a big consideration that we’ve covered in a previous article.  You’ll have to provide for them if you do indeed intend to save them.  Special needs members of your family, such as infants and toddlers, the elderly, and any family member with a medical condition…you need to provide for those needs well in advance.

Especially for them, you want to load up on whatever supplies you need to take care of them and move any equipment or supplies that you can manage for them into that shelter.  After the war commences, there won’t be any more deliveries of those necessities.  Research Cresson Kearney’s work and put these measures into place…stocking up on the supplies you need and coordinating all of your initial actions with your family prior to the arrival of that fateful day.  Hopefully, none of these measures will be needed, but if they are, it will give you a better chance if you determine them and implement them beforehand.  Stay in that good fight!  JJ out!

 

Additional Reading on Nuclear Preparedness:

How to Survive When a Nuke Is Dropped

An Urban Guide to Surviving a Nuclear Attack

A Step-By-Step Guide to Preparing For Any Disaster

What Happens to Nuclear Power Plants Following an EMP?

Mom, Could You Please Pass the Potassium Iodide?

How can I avoid radiation exposure?

7 Natural Supplements You Should Have in Case of Nuclear Fallout

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Originally published June 6th, 2017
Comments Off on The Family Preparedness Guide to Surviving a Nuclear Disaster