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Prepper Training: This is How to Prepare Your Body to Escape the Big City on Foot February 16, 2017

bugging out on foot
ReadyNutrition Readers, this piece covers some of the basic fundamentals on road marching.  Yes, this is a typical military exercise, but it has several applications for you in terms of preparations and in training.  Road marches can be both physically demanding and challenging.  They should not be attempted without proper preparation, and if you have any underlying health conditions, consult with your doctor prior to doing them.

As I have mentioned in previous articles, I prefer the large-frame Alice Pack of the US Army, the one I have been using for many decades, now.  It is both sturdy and affordable, and can meet a person’s needs from a training and a survival perspective.  That mentioned, it is up to you to find one that feels both comfortable and offers you the support you need to be able to move on the road or cross-country with weight on your back.

Don’t road march cold: you need to take the time to do some light calisthenics to warm your muscles up prior to the physical exertion.  The weight you will tote with you will vary according to your abilities and physical condition, as well as the needs of the exercise.  It is a training event: you need to keep it as such and hold it in that regard.  You need proper footgear and comfortable clothing, as well as a water supply.  You need to prepare for it the night before, with a good meal and plenty of rest and fluids prior to your start.

Your stretches can include (but not be limited to) the side-straddle hop (referred to as “jumping jacks,”) as well as half-squats, squats, hamstring and calf stretches, and so forth.  I prefer boots to support my ankles, although I have seen many people using tennis shoes and hiking shoes.  Whatever your preference, as long as it gives your arch the support it needs.

Start out small, with a lighter amount of weight.  That will be on you to gauge.  Start by doing a mile, and then work your way up.  A good conservative plan for a road marching “schedule” can be one per week with lighter weights and shorter distances.  As you “work your way up” you’ll want to make the road marches less frequent.  The reason being is you don’t want to damage yourself with a potential stress fracture or a hairline fracture from continuously pounding the pavement with your feet and heavy weight on the shoulders.  Shin splints are a common occurrence over time, as well.

Medically, they’re referred to as MTSS (medial tibial stress syndrome), and are pains within the connective muscle and tissue surrounding your knee and the outside of your tibia.  It is a chronic “dull” aching feeling that arises in about 15 to 20% of people who run, walk, or (in this case) march long distances.  Ice packs and rest can enable you to recover in a short period of time.  For any question of it, consult with your physician if the problem persists.

The road marches will strengthen your legs and back, and also develop your cardiovascular capabilities.  You should time every one of them, and attempt gains each time you undertake a march.  Gains would take the form of quicker times, or more weight carried.  You have to do it gradually.  Eventually, your end goal is to carry what you normally would in a rucksack if the SHTF and you were out in the woods.  Cross-country is markedly different from doing it on the side of the road due to the uneven terrain as well as other factors, such as water, thick vegetation, an abundance of rocks, etc.

Weather is also a factor, and in the warmer months great care must be taken to ensure you don’t dehydrate yourself.  Remember: thirst is a late sign of dehydration, and means you’re already depleted when you feel thirsty.  It would also be good to undertake these marches with a partner, so that if an emergency arises you have someone with you to rely upon for first aid or to go for help.

Your endurance will improve with time, and it also takes adjustment for your feet to become accustomed to both your pace and the work.  It is an excellent lower-body exercise that still manages to work your upper body.  It requires discipline, determination, and preparation to accomplish.  Eventually you will see results, and can road march 2 to 4 times per month successfully as part of your physical regimen.

Remember to take account of the water you will carry when you initially weigh your rucksack.  You can pick up a good fishing and game scale that will enable you to find out exactly how much you tote.  Try it out.  It is cost effective and will give you some good results.  Happy rucking!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Originally published February 16th, 2017
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How Big Brother Could Be Spying on You Through Your Prescriptions February 15, 2017

bigbrother
 

Prescription meds are a way that the Big Brother state can maintain control over your medical supplies and monitor you as an individual.

In mid-January, an article came out entitled Feds force Doctors and Pharmacists to Spy on 60% of Americans,” and deals with the PMP, the Prescription Monitoring Program, and 48 states have adopted it.  The federal government keeps track of all your sensitive information (birth date, address, etc., and demographics on you) in the “interests of combating drug abuse.”

That reason is nothing more than a front to be able to monitor you and using the prescriptions as a “back door.”  It is the usual government mantra: “For the good of the whole,” “for the public safety,” ad infinitum ad nauseam.  The problem is that they utilize these existent programs to justify more and more control measures that eventually encompass everything you do.  A case in point is the hormone androstenedione.  This is a precursor hormone to testosterone, and the last “gate” before reaching testosterone on the metabolic pathway.

In 1997, it was a completely legal and obtainable as a supplement.  The East German Olympic athletes had a lot of success with it boosting testosterone (thus performance).  Later it was banned by the Olympic committee, and then the torch was taken up by the American sports agencies, then the FDA, and so on.  Now you cannot obtain it.  In many countries (especially in Europe) you cannot even have amino acids without a prescription.  In the last eight years, this country has followed suit in a lot of the practices of Europe.

How to ‘Opt-Out’ of Prescription Monitoring

  1. Stock up on as many nutritional supplements as you can, in the form of herbs, tinctures, and naturopathic aids such as vitamins and anything you can use
  2. Obtain as many long-shelf-life antibiotics for your fish and pets for as long as you can
  3. Learn how to replace medicines that may not be readily available by supplementing with herbal foods and natural food aids (you can’t call any of them “medicine,” by the way)
  4. Get yourself in shape (yes, this is why JJ writes so many articles dealing with physical training and conditioning), as this will prevent you from being ill and/or visiting with these Doctors…. Dr. Doolittle, or Dr. Do-Nothing. YOU ARE YOUR OWN BEST HEALTH CARE PROVIDER THROUGH PREVENTATIVE MEANS
  5. By following these instructions, it’ll keep you out from under the magnifying glass of feds or anyone else “lingering” from the Dark Ages of Obama’s reign.
  6. Practice OPSEC (Operational Security): don’t be a “Chatty Kathy” doll, to paraphrase Steve Martin…tell those worth telling, and only so they can emulate your actions…not to be the center of attention. Don’t let anyone know what you have or what you’re doing!

The last sentence of #6 is very important.  Such is not just to keep the government from prying in on you, but to prevent your nosy neighbors from knowing what you have surrounding a SHTF situation.  Today’s “Madge” from the Palmolive ad is tomorrow’s Marauder with a pickaxe hammering at your front door to get to your supplies.  We have a President who is taking action on behalf of the American people, but we’re not out of the woods yet.  Just because it’s sunlight outside doesn’t mean there are not plenty of vampires snoozing in coffins, just waiting for the opportunity to strike.  If they do, the best “wooden stake” you can use on them is to be prepared beforehand, and not expose yourself to them in the night.  May the sun always warm your back and light a path for your feet!  Keep fighting that good fight!  JJ out!

 

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Originally published February 15th, 2017
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The Importance of Firearms Maintenance in the Wintertime February 10, 2017

winterfirearm
Many guys and gals may wonder, “Why do we have to maintain firearms in the wintertime, since we’re not using them as much?” Well, there are different conditions to deal with in the wintertime that may affect your firearms adversely.  Many will just wrap them up in plastic after coating them with Cosmoline or some other lubricant-preservative.  This does not necessarily protect them from changing conditions during the wintertime that may go unnoticed.

First, I stress that you should clean and inspect your weapons at a minimum of once per week.  If it is done less frequently, then you must take several factors into consideration: temperature, change in temperature, humidity, sunlight, and location your firearms are kept/stored.  If you happen to have a temperature/climate-controlled gun storage safe or the equivalent, then you can “whittle” your time down for disassembly and inspection of your firearm.  For the rest of us (myself included), a regular maintenance program is essential.

Depending on where in your house you store your firearm and how you store it (in a gun safe, or a moisture-controlled case, for example) will dictate the challenges you’ll face.  Alternating temperatures cause some problems.  If you have a home that (when you’re inside of it) the temperature is kept at 70 degrees F or such, if the temperature drops to say 50 or 60, you may have problems with moisture.  The weather (and the relative humidity) will also be a factor.


Metal tends to “sweat” with a change in temperature, that is for condensation to build up, especially when the change is drastic or sudden.


You’ve been outside all day hunting that deer with your Winnie ’94 30-30.  You just came into the house, and after kicking off your boots you hung your Winnie ’94 up on the gun rack.  Guess what?  In about ten to fifteen minutes, even if you were as dry as dust coming through the door…the weapon will have condensation all over it from the sudden change in temperature.

Another scenario is that you must vent out the house a bit: your woodstove has been on “overdrive” and you need to air out the place just a tad.  It’s raining outside and humid.  When that cold air and moisture wafts inside, guess where it’ll go?  Yep, right onto the barrel and mechanism of that trusty rifle you have hanging over the mantelpiece.

Another one is that you have a rack in your bedroom, and you opened the drapes to allow a little sunlight into the room…and it just happened to hit your rifle on the rack.  The rifle gains about 20 degrees from the sun, and then when it leaves, the coolness of the room and the weapon’s proximity to the window causes the sweating.

During the wintertime, it isn’t enough just to pack it all up and wait until the springtime.  As far as things are with me, the only time I would ever pack one up is if I’m transporting it somewhere and it needs to be encased and protected for a few days to a week.  Other than that, I stick to my regular maintenance schedule.  First thing you do, is wipe off any excess moisture on the weapon.  Then completely disassemble it and carry out an inspection of all your parts.  You are looking for any debris and any buildup of ferrous oxide (that’s rust!) from excessive moisture.  There shouldn’t be any.

The reason there shouldn’t be is that there will not be…if you carry out a regular program of maintenance.  You haven’t fired it; however, you can still run patches through the bore with a light coating of lube on them.  Clean off any rust and oil all your parts.  It protects from rust or moisture.

Also, want to save a little money?  You don’t have to bankrupt yourself on those stingy little bottles of lube/gun oil…a 3 or 4-ounce bottle…for 7 or 8 dollars.  Go buy yourself a quart of 5W/30 Mobil Synthetic oil.  We used to use it in the service, and I still use it now.  Does the job just as good and (most of the time) better than those cheap, thin, junk oils such as Hoppe’s or Remington’s or the like.  A quart will last you a long time, and then you just refill the small bottles that you normally use with it.

Same for patches.  Take an old t-shirt, sheet, or pillowcase.  Cut out your squares on your own, and also cut yourself some 1’ squares for general purpose weapons cleaning rags.  These can be washed and then reused a couple of times.  Use a bristle brush of some kind and brush the oil vigorously all over your working parts, and then wipe off any carbon and/or rust you have.  Then give it a fresh coat (thin), and reassemble the weapon.  Voila!  Your weapon is good to go.  Make sure that when you reassemble it that you perform a functions check on it, and ensure that it has been reassembled properly without any glitches.

One thing you can also do is to “shroud” your weapons.  This is merely covering them as they are on a rack with a sheet of some kind.  Try to match the surrounding colors of the room.  If you have a white wall, then a white sheet would be a good thing.  This keeps dust from settling on the weapon, and any ash/soot from the woodstove, as well.  It also keeps your weapons out of sight for when some “snoopy” human comes over to the front door, such as the ever-present, never-reliable neighbors, or some door-to-door sales clown, or some other pest.  The less they see the better.

Minimum of once per week per firearm.  An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, as Ben Franklin once said.  Protect them within a case for when you’re traveling, and remember to give them a good wiping down and a thorough lube when you reach your destination.  Maintain that firearm at all times, and it’ll see you through, whether you’re hunting deer or stopping someone from breaking into your home.  Keep that powder dry and stay in that good fight!  JJ out!

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Originally published February 10th, 2017
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