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This Rare and Lethal Superbug Has Spread Outside of Hospitals June 26, 2017

By now we’re all well aware of “superbugs,” or antibiotic resistant bacteria. These terrifying pathogens present a grave threat to the future of human health, because they’ve grown immune to our best medical treatments.

But not all superbugs are created equal. Some are certainly more common than others, and certain strains carry a higher mortality risk. Perhaps the most dangerous superbug is Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriacea, also known as CRE.

It’s been called a “nightmare” superbug, and is considered among the most dangerous superbugs by the World Health Organization. CRE is immune to pretty much every form of antibiotic, and typically kills half of its victims. Unlike antibiotic resistant staph infections, which are frequently mentioned in the news, you’ve probably never heard of CRE. That’s because this bacteria typically only shows up in hospital patients. It normally resides harmlessly in the gut, until certain medical procedures accidentally transfer it to the bloodstream. So long as CRE stays in that environment, it’s not something the average person has to worry about.

Unfortunately, that state of affairs has changed. Last December, six people in Colorado were infected with CRE, and miraculously they all survived. What’s so puzzling and alarming about this, is that it appears none of these individuals were infected in a hospital.

But the six people in the new report had not stayed in a health care facility for at least a year before they contracted the infection. They had not recently undergone surgery or dialysis, either, and hadn’t received any invasive devices, such as having a catheter or feeding tube inserted — all of which can be risk factors for CRE infections, the report said.

Thus, the six cases appear to be “community-associated” CRE infections, meaning the patients may have picked up these bacteria from somewhere in their everyday lives, outside of a health care setting.

CRE infections outside of a health care setting are “unusual for these bacteria,” said study researcher Sarah Janelle, a health care-associated infections epidemiologist at the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment. These six cases suggest that “these bacteria might be moving from health care to community settings,” Janelle told Live Science. “Further surveillance of CRE is needed to determine whether this pattern continues in Colorado and to determine if this trend is occurring in other parts of the United States,” Janelle said.

Pretty much the only thing these patients had in common, is that they all suffered from urinary tract infections at some point in the last two years. Considering how common UTI’s are and how long that timeline is, that doesn’t really solve the mystery of how they became infected with CRE. None of these individuals seem connected in any way.

All we know is that one of the world’s most lethal superbugs has somehow made the leap from an isolated hospital setting, to the general public. It’s a rare and frightening pathogen, that may not remain rare in the near future.

Joshua Krause was born and raised in the Bay Area. He is a writer and researcher focused on principles of self-sufficiency and liberty at Ready Nutrition. You can follow Joshua’s work at our Facebook page or on his personal Twitter.

Joshua’s website is Strange Danger

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Originally published June 26th, 2017
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The Chemical Used to Suppress Zika Is Having Terrible Effects on Infants June 9, 2017

The mosquito-borne Zika virus has largely disappeared from news headlines, and probably for good reason. The epidemic that started in South American in 2015, and threatened to spread to the United States, turned out to be a non-crisis for Americans. Zika, which is believed to cause microcephaly in babies, never gained a foothold in the United States.

But while fears were high, the government made some rather brash decisions to control mosquito populations that hadn’t even been infected with Zika. As a precautionary measure, they sprayed the environment in Florida and South Carolina with a chemical called “naled,” a pesticide so toxic that it’s banned in the EU. And they did so with little input from the public.

There’s a kind of dark irony that accompanies that decision, because the government was trying to stop a virus that causes birth defects. So in turn, they sprayed the environment with a chemical that also hurts babies. That’s the finding of a recent study, which examined babies in China who had been exposed to very low levels of naled.

The study, whose authors say it is the first to examine real-world exposure to naled outside workplace accidents or lab experiments, used cord blood from 237 mothers who gave birth to healthy babies at a hospital in southeast China between 2008 and 2011. At six weeks, the babies displayed no problems. But at nine months, the babies suffered from slight problems with coordination, movement and other motor functions.

The University of Michigan study was published in the peer-reviewed journal Environment International on Thursday.

While the study provided only a close snapshot of a particular group of mothers, the authors say it suggests the need to take a closer look at using naled to fight mosquitoes, particularly since problems surfaced at lower exposure levels than previous studies.

This shouldn’t come as a surprise, since previous animal studies involving naled have suggested that it could drastically shrink the brains of infants.

Leave it to the government to combat a virus that shrinks the brains of infants and reduces motor function, by spraying a chemical that probably shrinks the brains of infants and reduces motor function.

Joshua Krause was born and raised in the Bay Area. He is a writer and researcher focused on principles of self-sufficiency and liberty at Ready Nutrition. You can follow Joshua’s work at our Facebook page or on his personal Twitter.

Joshua’s website is Strange Danger

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Originally published June 9th, 2017
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These Are the Early Warning Signs That Most Cancers Have in Common May 31, 2017

Most people don’t bother to learn what the early warning signs of cancer are. That is until they or someone they love comes down with some form of the disease. I can understand why. People don’t really like to think about their own mortality, much less a deadly disease that often strikes unexpectedly, and costs tens of thousands of dollars to treat. Plus, there are so many forms of cancer with differing symptoms. Trying to learn them all can seem quite daunting.

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Fortunately, there are a handful of symptoms that most or all forms of cancer share. Learning these symptoms can help you get on the path to treatment as soon as possible, and better your odds of survival. Don’t let squeamishness keep you from learning about these critical signs:

  1. One of the first signs is sudden and unexplained weight loss. It’s also one of the most common symptoms among cancer patients. Even before patients begin treatments like chemotherapy, they often experience a loss of appetite as part of a metabolic syndrome called cachexia.
  2. Along with weight loss and a lack of appetite, cancer can take a lot out of you, and leave your body with fewer resources for normal functions. That’s why common symptoms include sores and other injuries that refuse to heal.
  3. Cancer can often lead to various forms of internal bleeding. That’s why you should look out for blood in vomit, urine or feces. And because of that blood loss, you may begin to experience severe and persistent fatigue, regardless of whether or not you see any blood.
  4. Though cancer occurs in part because your immune system has failed to overcome it, that doesn’t mean that your immune is twiddling its thumbs. Cancer can cause a potent immune response, and with that, a fever that can last days or weeks.
  5. Obviously, if you notice a mole on your skin that continues to grow, it could be a sign of skin cancer. However, there are multiple skin conditions that can be signs other forms of cancer. If you notice a rash; skin that is darkened, yellowed, or red; or skin that suddenly sprouts more hair than usual, it can indicate multiple forms of cancer.
  6. And finally, pay attention to any lumps that you can feel under the skin. Most people know that lumps in the testicles or breast tissue can be signs of cancer, but you should be wary of lumps that form anywhere.

Joshua Krause was born and raised in the Bay Area. He is a writer and researcher focused on principles of self-sufficiency and liberty at Ready Nutrition. You can follow Joshua’s work at our Facebook page or on his personal Twitter.

Joshua’s website is Strange Danger

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Originally published May 31st, 2017
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