shtfusa

Are you Prepared?

5 Quick Emergency Foods for All Situations September 20, 2017

ReadyNutrition Readers, we have been covering a host of different disasters and scenarios for preps.  One thing we have not mentioned is the need for food in these situations that meet the challenge of the disaster.  What are we talking about here?  For starters, we need food that we can bust open and eat immediately…that will give us some kind of energy with nutritional value…but that we can eat without needing to go off somewhere and sit down.  Even more: food that we can eat without taking a break in stride.

This poses the following conditions for the food: it must be pre-cooked or prepared previously so that no heating or preparation is required.  The biggest problem with this is in the winter months, but we’ll address that issue later.  Let’s look at some foods that it would not be an inconvenience to tote around, either on your person or in a small bag or even a briefcase.  Remember, we’re looking for high protein, medium carbs, and low fat.  Here we go:

5 Quick Emergency Foods

  1. Beef Jerky/Smoked, Cured Jerky and meats: In general, you receive a lot with jerky and beef sticks…on average a 1-ounce portion or piece/stick is about 10-12 g of protein. Considering that it keeps for a long time and doesn’t need to be cooked, with just about a quarter of a pound, you are taking in 40-48 g of protein.  This is very good, especially in a high-stress environment where you’re burning up a lot of energy.  Please go back and refer to some of my articles on protein intake and how “cannibalism” (during the catabolic phase) to break down muscle tissue and use it for energy works.
  2. Nuts: Peanuts, almonds, sunflower seeds, and so forth, usually run about 7-8 grams of protein, about the same in carbohydrates, and double the amount in fat. They have a high-fat content; however, nuts are packed with resveratrol, a chemical that is a vasodilator that improves circulation.  In addition, during a disaster, the extra fat content will not be harmful, as it provides satiety (feeling of fullness), as well as giving you some valuable electrolytes, such as sodium and potassium.  These, too are readily available and easily “munched” down on the go.  Dry-roasted, shelled pistachios are a good one with high protein and high Omega’s, as well as the minerals and electrolytes.
  3. Dried Fruits: will give you some simple sugars and carbohydrates for the body. Long-term benefits will be to provide some fiber.  This is very important in a disaster, as peristaltic activity (the activity of the bowels in digestion) tends to slow down and become depressed substantially with stress.  This results in constipation and hardened stools that can cause cramps and discomfort and even lead to a major problem, such as a blockage, as in the condition called obstructed ileus.  Some examples of dried fruits good to pack with you are figs, apricots, raisins, cranberries, and prunes…the latter being the best for prevention of constipation when used in moderate amounts.  Prunes are also extremely high in Potassium, a vital electrolyte.
  4. Fruit/Granola/Power “Bars”: These can be pretty good for quick energy and some carbohydrates and fiber. They are not necessarily high in the protein department, except if they’re specified for such.  Keep in mind: they’re not meant to serve as long-term meal substitutes, but instead are for a quick energy food for convenience.
  5. Protein Powders – Milk and eggs are a few of the first foods to disappear before and following a disaster. We need supplements to make up for the lack of nutrients in our diets and also to “boost” our intake of needed materials.  Nutrients such as amino acids and protein, which I have written extensively about in previous articles. These are critical for our upkeep, and they must be obtained from our food.  A protein powder may or may not (or may partially) provide these amino acids.  Of particular importance are BCAA’s (Branched-Chain Amino Acids), such as L-Isoleucine, L-Leucine, and L-Valine.  These guys are very important for tissue repair. Read more on protein powders here.

It is critical to remember that you must drink water if you’re going to eat all these things.  Dried foods (and any food, for that matter) will suck the fluids right out of you if you don’t take in liquid.  These foods just mentioned can come in their own wrappers, or you can buy them in bulk and transfer them to plastic bags to tote with you for when the need arises.  It’s a simple thing to be able to throw them down without any effort, whether you’re in a fighting position overlooking a section of your property or in a pouring rainstorm trudging up a hill.  Apportion them accordingly, and take some of each item for a well-balanced meal that will do in a pinch.

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Originally published September 20th, 2017
Comments Off on 5 Quick Emergency Foods for All Situations

15 Priorities You Need to Follow In the Event of a Nuclear War September 15, 2017

One of the most important characteristics of survivalists, preppers, and their ilk is the ability to concede that no matter how improbable it may be for a situation to arise, it is still possible.  With the current state of affairs of the world being the way they are, there is nothing in the news that can truly dissuade a prepper from this concept.  That being said, what if a nuclear war occurs?  No, really: what will you do, and what actions will you take when it begins?

We have covered the topic of preparedness for a nuclear war before, but we have not discussed immediate actions to take within the first hours that such a nightmare becomes a reality.  First, let us mention again Cresson Kearney’s work Nuclear War Survival Skills,” and downloadable from the internet.  It is the end-all, be-all for information on preparedness for a nuclear war.

Learn How Tactical Gas Masks Can Save Your Life

The topic for this article is immediate actions to be taken when nuclear war presents itself; however, stress and emphasis must be made on preparations beforehand.  You want to garner all of the supplies possible beforehand and prepare a fallout shelter before the football game kicks off.  This will cut down on the scrambling when it all comes about.  There will be enough confusion in the works, and you don’t need to make any more for yourself through a lack of readiness by not having supplies you need in place.  Let’s cover some basics questions you need to answer for yourself and your family.

  1. A Plan: you need a plan to “kick into action” immediately, depending on where you are…at home, at work, or traveling. This plan needs to take into account what you’ll do if your engine dies (from the EMP, or Electromagnetic Pulse), for example, and you’re still five miles from home.
  2. “Rounding Up the Tribe”: How will you gather your family together? Do they know the plan and are they both on board with it and prepared to act in accordance with it?  You need an ORP (Objective Rally Point), so to speak: a place to meet together in one location, if for the purpose of consolidating and traveling back home together. This family preparedness guide for nuclear disasters is a great primer to get started.
  3. Assessing the Targeted Areas: this must be done beforehand, and if you are in a targeted area susceptible to attack, you better be prepared to move out of it.
  4. Personal Protection from Radiation: (in accordance with your assessment of how much radiation there will be) Do you have Geiger Counters (radiological survey meters), dosimeters, and a suit and mask to protect you from the radiation? If so, how will you get to them/into them when it occurs? What about supplements for radiation poisoning if you are exposed?
  5. [We’re using a “Shelter in the Home” Scenario]: OK, you made it home. Now, do you have backup measures in place for the loss of electricity that will occur?  Do you have a shelter where you can “hole up” for at least the next three weeks to a month?  Is it defensible?  Can you effect such a defense while radiation is still at a dangerous level?  Let’s review what needs to be in the shelter:
  6. Food and water supply for all members…at least six months’ worth
  7. Medical supplies and equipment
  8. Shielded electronic supplies (radio, night vision devices, etc., shielded until it is safe to expose them with no threat of EMP) in Faraday cages.
  9. Weapons and ammunition to defend yourselves
  10. Tools and materials to repair or replace components of the shelter
  11. Equipment to monitor radiation levels inside and outside of the shelter
  12. Sanitation and hygiene measures (people don’t stop going to the bathroom or needing to clean themselves regularly)
  13. Books and reading material: survival oriented, and also for a diversion
  14. After the exchange has halted: What will you and your family do then?  Remain in place, or head for new ground?

There won’t be a lot of time for action.  Hopefully, you’ll be at home, and able to take steps from there.  Such steps can include (but are not limited to): covering all of the basement windows with dirt, and if you have a basement or sub-basement shelter, securing all parts of it prior to relocating into it with your family.  You’ll already (hopefully) have your supplies ready and in position, but you can also run the water and fill up as many containers as possible to take down with you.  Same with food: any canned or dried goods that you can move from the upstairs into the shelter will be money in the bank for you later.

There’s never enough blankets and clothes: stock some of these down in your shelter.  Pets are a big consideration that we’ve covered in a previous article.  You’ll have to provide for them if you do indeed intend to save them.  Special needs members of your family, such as infants and toddlers, the elderly, and any family member with a medical condition…you need to provide for those needs well in advance.

Especially for them, you want to load up on whatever supplies you need to take care of them and move any equipment or supplies that you can manage for them into that shelter.  After the war commences, there won’t be any more deliveries of those necessities.  Research Cresson Kearney’s work and put these measures into place…stocking up on the supplies you need and coordinating all of your initial actions with your family prior to the arrival of that fateful day.  Hopefully, none of these measures will be needed, but if they are, it will give you a better chance if you determine them and implement them beforehand.  Stay in that good fight!  JJ out!

 

(Sign up for our FREE newsletter to get the latest prepping advice, gardening secrets, homesteading tips and more delivered straight to your inbox!)

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Originally published September 15th, 2017
Comments Off on 15 Priorities You Need to Follow In the Event of a Nuclear War

Last Minute Preparedness: How To Prep For Sheltering in Place September 14, 2017

ReadyNutrition Readers, this article is not a substitute for common sense, nor is it a “betting slip” of things to do to beat the odds.  With Hurricane Harvey dealing our beloved states of Texas and Louisiana a crippling blow and with Hurricane Irma devastating the state of Florida, one thing is for sure – the nation needs to focus on preparedness…in all departments and for all disasters.  We’re going to run with this ball to give a checklist of things to do if there is a need to stay at home.

Sometimes it’s not just a matter of being either “hard-headed,” or rooted within the home and sentimentalities.  Sometimes there are things that force a family to stay in place and try to face what is coming, regardless of what the rest of the people in the area are doing.  Examples of this would be when a family member cannot be transported or moved, or when the family is unable to do it logistically for fear of losing everything or the great hardships imposed by fleeing.

Undoubtedly the army of skeptics is ready to call for fire on my position.  Before “Splash out,” sounds on the radio, however, the last sentence is the reality.  It happened that way in New Orleans with Katrina.  Whatever the situation or the reasons, it is not the focus of this piece to argue with Ned the Naysayer, but to provide something to help those who need it.  First advice:

If you can leave the area before the disaster strikes, then do so, and seek shelter elsewhere.

Now to the business at hand.  The more able-bodied people you have in the family to help you, the quicker you can expedite these basic tasks.  Review my articles on Katrina, and much of this ties into what my family and I did there.  We’re going to focus on stuff for a hurricane primarily, and then tailor-make it into advice to suit other disasters as well.

  1. Precut and preposition materials to close the “soft” spots of the house: plywood, 2” x 4” s, nails, screws, and plastic sheeting…these can be used to close off sliding glass doors, board up windows, and shore up spots that can be entered. If you have the time, then measure everything and cut pieces beforehand to set in place and then attach when the emergency is nearing.  Make sure there are extras of these materials in case there’s a breach of some kind.
  2. Bins and Bags: Place all your food (canned, dry goods, freeze-dried, dehydrated) into bins, and (depending on what floor you live on) raise them up so they’re above ground and secure. The reason is twofold: to protect from water, and so that you can grab them and move out with the food supply.  If you don’t have bins, use cardboard boxes and then place them into thick garbage bags.  Think on your feet.
  3. Tools: Centralize the tools you need (any kind of cordless drills or saws will be worth their weight in gold if they’re all charged up. Be able to do their function manually, just in case an EMP (Electromagnetic Pulse) attack or a Solar Flare occurs.  Make sure they’re protected from water or the elements and that everyone knows where they are and how to use them.  Don’t forget tools that you can use to get out, as well, if need be, such as a crowbar and an 8-lb. maul.
  4. Light: In the form of flashlights, battery-powered lanterns, and chem lights, for starters. Kerosene and white gas lanterns are nice, but be sure to use them after the initial consternation is over, such as the raging winds and so forth.  You don’t want to add fire to the list of complications that will present itself.  Make sure each family member has their own flashlight!  This seems a small thing, but it’s not.  Get a good one, such as a Maglite pen-light for $7 or $8.  You’d be surprised how much confusion results when the lights go out.  If it’s an EMP or war that brings about the power loss?  You better have blackout curtains or blankets to hang up and block out any light from escaping out of your windows.  Be sure: step outside (if there’s no radiation, of course) and make sure no light is coming out of those edges.
  5. Medical Equipment and Supplies: any family member who has special needs, such as medication must have access to that medication at all times unless they cannot administer it to themselves for any reason. All first aid equipment should be in a central location where everyone knows where the supplies are.  Each family member should have a small kit for themselves, as well, in case they are separated from the group.
  6. Water: Fill every container that can be filled and closed with a secure/tight lid. Fill all bathtubs, sinks, buckets, and so on.  You’re going to need water…on average at least two gallons per person per day.  Don’t forget the pets!  You’re responsible for them, and if you take care of them they may return the favor when it’s needed.
  7. Pet needs: we just mentioned it with the water. Make sure anything they need is in a bin…food, medical supplies, and materials to keep them clean and comfortable.
  8. The toilet: If you haven’t taken my advice from earlier articles, now is the time to pick up a toilet with a bucket that you can line with a plastic bag. Even if you do have municipal sewage, there’s the chance it may back up.  In addition, you can’t afford to use the water.  Tie it up in the bag and store this in a big bin for burning or disposal later.  Make sure you have enough bags to line it and plenty of toilet paper protected in plastic bags.
  9. Weapons: this one is going to draw the most criticism, but in the end, the decision rests with you and your balance between what is needed and your “love” for the law. Remember: the lawmakers of your state are already evacuated on your tax dime.  Every member of the family who is mature and responsible needs to be armed or have a firearm available if defense becomes an issue.  The “leaders” of the household need to carry, night and day.  Ammo and cleaning equipment needs to be safeguarded from the elements and readily available.
  10. Assign Tasks: Yes, that’s right. Everyone in the family needs a task assigned.  The younger members will feel a strong sense of participation and be both valued and needed.  Keep it simple for them, but they can do things, too, such as look after the pets and help take care of grand mom, who is bedridden, for example.  Tasking everyone also helps to reduce stress by giving a point of focus to concentrate on.  Assign someone (maybe grand mom, if she can do it) to monitor the radio or a small portable TV for news.
  11. Heads up with “Safe” Neighbors: this is a truly decisive issue and a judgment call. Only who you trust and trust absolutely!  You may be able to make a “heads up” with a close neighbor and family to help one another in time of need.
  12. Last Minute Pickups before the Midnight Hour: Fuel, canned food, as much cash as you can afford to withdraw, any last-minute medical supplies, batteries, extra radios, automotive equipment…anything you might need last minute…buy it. [especially ice and some Styrofoam coolers if it’s summertime…this for #14 below!  I did it, and you can, too]
  13. Vehicles: read what we did in my articles about Katrina. Flooding expected?  Stash the vehicle on high, as in a parking garage.  They’ll fine or ticket you?    They won’t have time to tow you, and guess what?  Your vehicle will be working when the time comes. As well, consider adding a 3-day supply of emergency items to the car in the instance that you have to bug out.
  14. Perishable food: cook it all as quickly as you can, and then refrigerate it. Better to have it cooked and then eat it than have it go bad.  When the time comes, throw it on the ice, as I mentioned above.  This will both save some of your perishables and also keep you from going into your longer-term/stable supplies.
  15. Firefighting gear: a couple of ABC-rated fire extinguishers may be a good investment. Keep them handy, charged up, and make sure all your family members know how to use them.

These tips will get you started.  We’ll cover more and be more specific for different types of disasters.  The important thing is to get these preps done and in place, and to think outside of the box.  In the end, you are responsible for your own preparedness, and to adjust accordingly for each specific type of disaster you face.  Fight that good fight, and fight it to win.  JJ out!

 

Additional Reading:

A Green Beret’s Guide to Hurricane Season Preparedness

Checklist for Exterior Home Preparation For Natural Disasters

How To Escape a Sinking Vehicle

Tips On How To Fortify And Prep Your Home Or Apartment

 

(Sign up for our FREE newsletter to get the latest prepping advice, gardening secrets, homesteading tips and more delivered straight to your inbox!)

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

Originally published September 14th, 2017
Comments Off on Last Minute Preparedness: How To Prep For Sheltering in Place